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My Fuji won't replace my Canon

I hear it quite often these days: DSLRs are dead. Mirrorless cameras are enough for everything. I personally can say that I love my 5D MK III as well my mirrorless Fuji X-E2. The latter one will not replace my DSLR. Let me share my top 3 examples of things I am missing on my Fuji, so that I still use my 5D for the respective photos.

 

 

My DSLR

My mirrorless

 

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You don't need that f***in' light meter

When it comes to awesome photo light, many roads lead to Rome. You can meter your light with a handheld incident meter or you can simply read the correct setting from your histogram. In this podcast episode I explain how I do the latter one all the time.

 

 

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E-TTL, i-TTL or manual?

Through the Lens metering is an awesome functionality. Canon's E-TTL and Nikons i-TTL are sophisticated and help you out tremendously when you have to shoot fast, for example when you cover a wedding with your camera. However, when you make photographs of models you usuallly have a minute or two to setup the power of your flash and the exposure values of your camera manually. Does this pay off? I think it does in many cases.

 

 

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Enough juice for HSS and Auto FP

HSS and Auto FP are awesome for using your speedlight to bring life into scenes outdoors on a bright day. However, many photographers are a bit afraid that their flash will be not strong enough. Many think that highspeed sync might eat up their batteries too fast. In today’s episode I try to give tips on all of that.

 

Here’s the stuff that I use:


Eneloop Batteries


Tenergy / Knox 16 bay charger

 

 

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Why your photos with backlighting might look flat


Technically backlighting does not make your photos more flat. But practically this effect will often be the outcome when shooting photos against a strong light source like your flash and like the sun.

You can either accept this as a cool style, or you can make up for it by creating a scene that allows for the introduction of side lighting or by stacking adding a clear foreground and background to your photo.

 

The awesome examples that I refer to in the podcast are in

Good Light! Magazine Issue 09

 

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The right lighting ratio - 3 tips

Tip 1 
Use the following ratios as your starting point
1:1 for beauty, 
2:1 for portraits of women, 
4:1 portraits of men, 
8:1 Character portraits, artistic photos and similar 

If you don't know better: Start with your favorite ratio, mine is 2:1, I set my Mainlight to 1/4, fill to 1/8
Make a photo
Check the contrast
Tune from there

Tip 2
When in doubt, go for a smaller ratio. It's better to shoot the photo a bit to boring and then add a bit of contrast in postprod in lightroom, then shoot it with too much contrast. LR let's you add contrast without any loss of quality, but quality will always decrease once you try to lower contrast

Tip 3
For your lighting ratios to show, use an angle of 45-90 degrees between key- and fill-light.
Your flashes have to light your subject from different sides in order for your ratios to take effect.
The chosen light ratio will show on your photo in those areas where your light sources don't overlap

Check out the podcast for my attempt of explaining the basics of light ratios.

 

Like to get an invite to my FREE Cover Shoot workshop at Photokina 2014?

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Easy Release Android

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3 tips on getting a signed model release

They quite often approach me with funky TfP contracts and weird releases. Models rightfully want to base their work on a solid legal foundation. So do I. That’s why I rather decline a photo shoot than doing it without my standard Getty Model Release. Thankfully pretty much every model agrees to it. That’s why today I share my 3 tips on getting a signed model release.

 

Getty Image Releases


Easy Release iOS


Easy Release Android

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Earning money shooting for magazines

There are a number of magazines that accept photo submissions from photographers, who would like to see their work published. But how to drive it up to the next level and start getting paid for magazine work?

 

Free Magazine Photography Pricing Guide


Good Light! Magazine Submissions

 

Ed fills in all gaps – for free!

I was nervous as hell because it was one of my very first photos. Back in 2006 I had just started with photography. Even though I used a simple one light setup I was not in full control. The studio flash in the strip light was too bright and instead of bringing it down to a quarter power, I actually closed down my aperture to f/20. The spectacular woman posing in front of my camera was Miss Universe Shape. Lyen Wong must have noticed that I was way out of my comfort zone. But then again, it was nothing new for her to see me struggling. She had been my  fitness coach for quite some time and in the gym she had forced me again and again to do exercises that my body was simply not made for.

 

Camera in hand I concentrated on one single basic thing: no blown out highlights. Or as I would have said in 2006: No blinking pixels on my LCD. Arriving there by stopping down instead of lowering the flash power was probably unprofessional but it was good enough. I just focused on the basics instead of trying to do everything perfect, which by that time would have been impossible for me anyway. As a result, I made a couple of photos that Lyen and myself really liked.

 

In the early days I learned lighting from the awesome Ed Verosky.  He’s always making things simple. Again and again he is hammering home basics. It’s great if you know a bunch of nice photo tricks, but by the end of the day it’s about being on top of the basics. If you have ANY gaps in your photography basics, anything from DSLR Shooting Modes to Exposure Adjustments with EC and FEC, then treat yourself with Ed’s latest blogpost. He is covering all the basics. Completely. I still can’t believe that this is just a blogpost - totally free and no opt-in required. Enjoy!

 

DSLR Complete Guide (free)

Adjust your screen or fly blind

Does your screen show you the white perls in the white veil on the white background?

Is your screen clipping some highlights or shaddows, so other people might see photoshop mistakes in your photos that you simply can't see on your screen? I'd like to touch on calibration devices like the Spyder and why you may or may not need one depending on what you do with your photos.

 

Links

The Calibration Wallpaper
The Spyder I use for color calibration

Photo 

Playmate Evlin Aubert
​Do you see the white perls in the white veil on the white background?

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